10:58 am - Wed, Mar 26, 2014
12 notes
passthesnacks: Season 3 Finale—“Two Plane Rides”
Excuse us for still needing time to process, but that was one hell of a finale for the third season of one of our favorite shows. The “Girls” finale had everything— MFAs, infidelity, a failed Glaciology course, and even an attempted assisted suicide. Literally, EVERYTHING. There is so much to cover for the finale, but we want to thank everyone was was reading along with us this season, and for anyone involved in the live-tweeting during the show.
THREE QUOTES: 
1. Shosana makes her feelings very clear to Ray at the start of “Major Barbara”: 
"We’re going to have a chat. At intermission, you’re going to buy me some m&m’s and we’re going to have a FUCKING CHAT"
2. Elijah grounding an excited Hannah in tenets of basic geography: 
Hannah: “You’re not going to be without me all the time, I’ll be back and forth— I’ll be bi-coastal.”
Elijah: “Iowa is not a coast.” 
3. Jessa gets a dose of sobering reality from a suicidal artist: 
Beadie: “Jessa, don’t you take any of these pills after I’m gone.” 
Jessa: “I won’t— I, somehow they don’t look nearly as fun when they’re being used to murder someone.” 
TWO IMAGES:

1. #SHOSHRAGE: We’ve seen Shoshana let loose a few times this season [Beach house, anyone?], but this mosh pit for one was a perfect release, and the finale’s most GIF-able moment. 

2. Marnie= Creeper: Though she admits that she does not value the emotional property of other women and that she uses sex as a form of validation, it does not stop Marnie from creeping around corners, plotting her next move. DO NOT LEAVE YO MAN WITH MARNIE!
ONE TOPIC TO EXPLORE FURTHER: 
For the finale of this episode, we wanted to think through the idea of whether or not these characters are selfish, as many people on Twitter and Reddit have claimed, or if their decision making is appropriate for the time in their lives. Hannah and Ray, to us, seem like polar opposites in their view of the world, but they ended up as great case-studies for our final topic to explore further of the season— is it developmentally appropriate for people in their twenties to make “selfish” decisions? 

JP: Seven weeks ago, I got a call from the admissions department of a school informing me that I had been accepted into their grad program. I was so happy that I immediately called my family and told my friends— I even instagrammed a photograph of one of my acceptance letters. Hell, I wanted to tell anyone that would listen… I’M GOING TO BUSINESS SCHOOL. So, when I saw the look on Ms. Hannah Horvath’s face as she read her acceptance letter to the Iowa Writers Workshop, I felt so happy for her. She immediately called her parents who were ecstatic for her, helping her realize that she accomplished something big. She told Marnie, who instead of being jelly, was so happy for Hannah that she gave her an awk Marnie hug and told her that she HAS to go to Iowa. 
The episode, which was appropriately titled “Two Plane Rides,” explored what happens when distance starts to culminate in a relationship. Since Adam landed his role in Major Barbara, Hannah’s been hyper aware of her own creative shortcomings— flailing about, feeling unfulfilled at her job. Her jealousy of his Broadway success paired with her disdain for selling out creatively ultimately led to her quitting her cushy job at GQ. Some people criticized her decision to leave as being rash and ill planned but I couldn’t help but understand where she was coming from. She was selling out. She was working a job that was not fulfilling her. Meanwhile, her boyfriend and best friend were making strides in their creative pursuits. “Are you going to be O.K.?” Shosh asked. “Adam’s about to be on Broadway and Marnie’s clearly meant to be a pop star and, I don’t know, and you were like supposed to be the famous artist in this group.” 

Almost everyone I know is going through some sort of mid-twenties millennial quarter life crisis. The crisis of coming to grips with the fact that we’re not in college anymore and our decisions are ultimately shaping us to be the people we are going to be. The relationships we enter are a little more serious than they were while we were in undergrad. The jobs we take give us specific experience which often times narrows our future potential employment possibilities to be within that same field. Some people are getting engaged and others are Tindering themselves silly. Ultimately, we all want the same thing. We just want to be happy. We want to work a job that leaves us feeling fulfilled. We want to be in a relationship with someone we trust, love and support and we expect the same from our lover. 
Hannah getting into grad school is HUGE for her so it’s no surprise that she immediately wanted to share the news with everyone she cared about. Some have criticized her telling Adam right before he went on stage for the first time as a selfish move but I am hesitant to agree with that. She told Adam,  ”Watching you thrive creatively over these past few weeks has made me want to thrive…I want to find a whole new world in the shape of me and just fill it up.” Sure, Hannah could have waited until after the play to tell Adam, but Hannah is impulsive. She may be a ditz but I don’t think she was acting out of ill intention. She just wanted to share the good news with her lover. Hannah made a decision for Hannah. It wasn’t about dumping Adam (we don’t know what the future has in store for the two of them) but it was about her pursuing her own dreams. I’m excited for Hannah to have a more structured life to help guide her professionally, regardless if that means that end of the Hannah-Adam saga.


OP: In a show called “Girls,” I didn’t expect for Ray to be such a driving force for our characters’ development, but he’s been there through it all, sometimes involving himself in the drama, as well. I’ve always viewed Ray as a standing antithesis of our four central female protagonists, as his pessimistic view of the world and direct communication style is a breath of fresh air among so many characters who are still trying to figure out what they want, and whose lack of direction has provided the bulk of the plot points for the last three seasons of the show. But what’s interesting is that despite sleeping with his ex-girlfriend’s friend, being deeply insecure at times, and generally being an asshole, Ray does not get the same labels we throw at Hannah— narcissistic, self-centered, unrelatable,etc. Part of me of me thinks there is some serious male privilege at play, as men are allowed to make decisions for themselves while women may be expected to consider the thoughts and feelings of everyone that matters to them in order to make sound decisions, but Ray’s journey to this finale starts way back in Season 1. I also want to point out that I don’t think it’s wrong to be self-centered sometimes, as I’ve seen the negative impacts of friends and family members who put tremendous amount of emphasis on romantic relationships or making decisions for other people. 
The first time Ray seemed relevant on the series  is when he encouraged Charlie to read Hannah’s Diary, and subsequently performed excerpts of it in front of a live audience, which showed us that he was emotionally involved in the lives of the other characters on this show. Fast forward a few episodes, and now Ray is chasing after a squirrely undergrad after she accidentally smoked crack, thrusting himself right into the center of the ridiculous antics these characters find themselves in, and somehow, falling in love. But as much as he judged everyone else, Ray was deeply flawed and insecure, which led to his breakup with Shoshana, but also his major turning point as a character on the show. Set to the tune of Tame Impala’s “Elephant,” Ray marched into his bosses office and demanded a change, to be given more responsibility and prove to himself (and Shoshana) that he had his life somewhat together, that he was worth dating and not just some loser working at a coffee shop. 
You might be asking yourself— what the fuck does this have to do with being selfish? Well, thank you for being patient. I bring all of this up because while Ray made tremendous progress in his professional life in the past season by opening up a new Grumpy’s with a pizza oven, I think he’s had to realize that he’s no longer trying to prove something to Shoshana, but that he has to prove something to himself first. We saw this a few times this season already with his soliloquy outside of the bar at Hannah’s birthday (which provided the best line of the season in my opinion— “cool cigarette”), and making it clear to Marnie that they shouldn’t try to pursue anything romantically. Though hurt, Ray tries to create distance between himself and the other characters on the show, because he realizes that his happiness and success comes from a place of personal agency and control, not from the value others assign to his life. And yet, when the woman who caused the positive change in his life is in front of him, tears in her eyes and professing that she wants him back, he is able to create further distance, noting, “Shosh. Look, I’m eternally grateful to you, because I have a real job now, with real responsibilities…You pushed me forward in a lot of ways, and i’m eternally appreciative of that. But right now we’re in different places. We have very, very different goals.” To me, that is a self-centered act, where Ray is choosing to put himself first, and it is completely ok. I’m happy for him and proud that he could have that much restraint in an emotionally charged conversation. What is not ok is that Hannah, making similar choices that have serious impacts for her life and future, is viewed as selfish and narcissistic (though timing could be better, I admit) and is almost villainized by audiences of the show. Both Hannah and Ray realize that there are choices and opportunities that have long-term impact, and as much as you love and care for other people, there are points where you have to be your own personal priority. The point is, we’re all selfish to varying degrees, and it takes making some selfish choices in your twenties to be ready to make decisions that impact other people later on in your life. Ray is being protective of his heart and his personal stability in the season finale because sometimes, you just gotta do you. 
// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

passthesnacksSeason 3 Finale—“Two Plane Rides”

Excuse us for still needing time to process, but that was one hell of a finale for the third season of one of our favorite shows. The “Girls” finale had everything— MFAs, infidelity, a failed Glaciology course, and even an attempted assisted suicide. Literally, EVERYTHING. There is so much to cover for the finale, but we want to thank everyone was was reading along with us this season, and for anyone involved in the live-tweeting during the show.

THREE QUOTES:

1. Shosana makes her feelings very clear to Ray at the start of “Major Barbara”:

"We’re going to have a chat. At intermission, you’re going to buy me some m&m’s and we’re going to have a FUCKING CHAT"

2. Elijah grounding an excited Hannah in tenets of basic geography:

Hannah: “You’re not going to be without me all the time, I’ll be back and forth— I’ll be bi-coastal.”

Elijah: “Iowa is not a coast.”

3. Jessa gets a dose of sobering reality from a suicidal artist:

Beadie: “Jessa, don’t you take any of these pills after I’m gone.”

Jessa: “I won’t— I, somehow they don’t look nearly as fun when they’re being used to murder someone.”

TWO IMAGES:

1. #SHOSHRAGE: We’ve seen Shoshana let loose a few times this season [Beach house, anyone?], but this mosh pit for one was a perfect release, and the finale’s most GIF-able moment.

2. Marnie= Creeper: Though she admits that she does not value the emotional property of other women and that she uses sex as a form of validation, it does not stop Marnie from creeping around corners, plotting her next move. DO NOT LEAVE YO MAN WITH MARNIE!

ONE TOPIC TO EXPLORE FURTHER:

For the finale of this episode, we wanted to think through the idea of whether or not these characters are selfish, as many people on Twitter and Reddit have claimed, or if their decision making is appropriate for the time in their lives. Hannah and Ray, to us, seem like polar opposites in their view of the world, but they ended up as great case-studies for our final topic to explore further of the season— is it developmentally appropriate for people in their twenties to make “selfish” decisions?

JP: Seven weeks ago, I got a call from the admissions department of a school informing me that I had been accepted into their grad program. I was so happy that I immediately called my family and told my friends— I even instagrammed a photograph of one of my acceptance letters. Hell, I wanted to tell anyone that would listen… I’M GOING TO BUSINESS SCHOOL. So, when I saw the look on Ms. Hannah Horvath’s face as she read her acceptance letter to the Iowa Writers Workshop, I felt so happy for her. She immediately called her parents who were ecstatic for her, helping her realize that she accomplished something big. She told Marnie, who instead of being jelly, was so happy for Hannah that she gave her an awk Marnie hug and told her that she HAS to go to Iowa.

The episode, which was appropriately titled “Two Plane Rides,” explored what happens when distance starts to culminate in a relationship. Since Adam landed his role in Major Barbara, Hannah’s been hyper aware of her own creative shortcomings— flailing about, feeling unfulfilled at her job. Her jealousy of his Broadway success paired with her disdain for selling out creatively ultimately led to her quitting her cushy job at GQ. Some people criticized her decision to leave as being rash and ill planned but I couldn’t help but understand where she was coming from. She was selling out. She was working a job that was not fulfilling her. Meanwhile, her boyfriend and best friend were making strides in their creative pursuits. “Are you going to be O.K.?” Shosh asked. “Adam’s about to be on Broadway and Marnie’s clearly meant to be a pop star and, I don’t know, and you were like supposed to be the famous artist in this group.”

Almost everyone I know is going through some sort of mid-twenties millennial quarter life crisis. The crisis of coming to grips with the fact that we’re not in college anymore and our decisions are ultimately shaping us to be the people we are going to be. The relationships we enter are a little more serious than they were while we were in undergrad. The jobs we take give us specific experience which often times narrows our future potential employment possibilities to be within that same field. Some people are getting engaged and others are Tindering themselves silly. Ultimately, we all want the same thing. We just want to be happy. We want to work a job that leaves us feeling fulfilled. We want to be in a relationship with someone we trust, love and support and we expect the same from our lover.

Hannah getting into grad school is HUGE for her so it’s no surprise that she immediately wanted to share the news with everyone she cared about. Some have criticized her telling Adam right before he went on stage for the first time as a selfish move but I am hesitant to agree with that. She told Adam,  Watching you thrive creatively over these past few weeks has made me want to thrive…I want to find a whole new world in the shape of me and just fill it up.” Sure, Hannah could have waited until after the play to tell Adam, but Hannah is impulsive. She may be a ditz but I don’t think she was acting out of ill intention. She just wanted to share the good news with her lover. Hannah made a decision for Hannah. It wasn’t about dumping Adam (we don’t know what the future has in store for the two of them) but it was about her pursuing her own dreams. I’m excited for Hannah to have a more structured life to help guide her professionally, regardless if that means that end of the Hannah-Adam saga.

OP: In a show called “Girls,” I didn’t expect for Ray to be such a driving force for our characters’ development, but he’s been there through it all, sometimes involving himself in the drama, as well. I’ve always viewed Ray as a standing antithesis of our four central female protagonists, as his pessimistic view of the world and direct communication style is a breath of fresh air among so many characters who are still trying to figure out what they want, and whose lack of direction has provided the bulk of the plot points for the last three seasons of the show. But what’s interesting is that despite sleeping with his ex-girlfriend’s friend, being deeply insecure at times, and generally being an asshole, Ray does not get the same labels we throw at Hannah— narcissistic, self-centered, unrelatable,etc. Part of me of me thinks there is some serious male privilege at play, as men are allowed to make decisions for themselves while women may be expected to consider the thoughts and feelings of everyone that matters to them in order to make sound decisions, but Ray’s journey to this finale starts way back in Season 1. I also want to point out that I don’t think it’s wrong to be self-centered sometimes, as I’ve seen the negative impacts of friends and family members who put tremendous amount of emphasis on romantic relationships or making decisions for other people.

The first time Ray seemed relevant on the series  is when he encouraged Charlie to read Hannah’s Diary, and subsequently performed excerpts of it in front of a live audience, which showed us that he was emotionally involved in the lives of the other characters on this show. Fast forward a few episodes, and now Ray is chasing after a squirrely undergrad after she accidentally smoked crack, thrusting himself right into the center of the ridiculous antics these characters find themselves in, and somehow, falling in love. But as much as he judged everyone else, Ray was deeply flawed and insecure, which led to his breakup with Shoshana, but also his major turning point as a character on the show. Set to the tune of Tame Impala’s “Elephant,” Ray marched into his bosses office and demanded a change, to be given more responsibility and prove to himself (and Shoshana) that he had his life somewhat together, that he was worth dating and not just some loser working at a coffee shop.

You might be asking yourself— what the fuck does this have to do with being selfish? Well, thank you for being patient. I bring all of this up because while Ray made tremendous progress in his professional life in the past season by opening up a new Grumpy’s with a pizza oven, I think he’s had to realize that he’s no longer trying to prove something to Shoshana, but that he has to prove something to himself first. We saw this a few times this season already with his soliloquy outside of the bar at Hannah’s birthday (which provided the best line of the season in my opinion— “cool cigarette”), and making it clear to Marnie that they shouldn’t try to pursue anything romantically. Though hurt, Ray tries to create distance between himself and the other characters on the show, because he realizes that his happiness and success comes from a place of personal agency and control, not from the value others assign to his life. And yet, when the woman who caused the positive change in his life is in front of him, tears in her eyes and professing that she wants him back, he is able to create further distance, noting, “Shosh. Look, I’m eternally grateful to you, because I have a real job now, with real responsibilities…You pushed me forward in a lot of ways, and i’m eternally appreciative of that. But right now we’re in different places. We have very, very different goals.” To me, that is a self-centered act, where Ray is choosing to put himself first, and it is completely ok. I’m happy for him and proud that he could have that much restraint in an emotionally charged conversation. What is not ok is that Hannah, making similar choices that have serious impacts for her life and future, is viewed as selfish and narcissistic (though timing could be better, I admit) and is almost villainized by audiences of the show. Both Hannah and Ray realize that there are choices and opportunities that have long-term impact, and as much as you love and care for other people, there are points where you have to be your own personal priority. The point is, we’re all selfish to varying degrees, and it takes making some selfish choices in your twenties to be ready to make decisions that impact other people later on in your life. Ray is being protective of his heart and his personal stability in the season finale because sometimes, you just gotta do you.

// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

Comments

2:01 pm - Mon, Mar 10, 2014
23 notes
passthesnacks: “Role-Play” - GIRLS Season 3 Episode 10 Recap
THREE QUOTES: 
Adam noting the wedges coming between him and Hannah:
"I’m not here to fill up your life with f*ckin’ stories for your f*ckin Twitter." - Adam
After Soojin asks Marnie if she’d like to be her assistant, since her best homo-friend is already the Director of the Gallery:
Marnie: “How old are you?” 
Soojin: “Two-four GURL. But for the cred and intrigue of the gallery, I’m going to tell people I’m 22.”  
Shoshana attempting to reconcile Jasper and Dottie’s relationship: 
“She’s dating an Egyptian, so she’s, like, super knowledgeable about what’s going on there.” 
TWO IMAGES:

What’s more tragic? How hard Marnie just got friend-zoned or the fact that she wore that beanie in multiple scenes during this episode?

Despite Hannah’s attempt to get “so clean” for Adam, she still battles a paperback for his attention 
ONE TOPIC TO EXPLORE FURTHER— DRIFTING APART
JP: We’ve all been there. You know, in that relationship where one person is obviously over it and the other person, well, isn’t. The beginning of the end, if you will. We’ve all said and done silly things in our attempts to keep the romance alive. We’ve all thrown on a blonde wig and told our lover to meet us at a bar while we role play as a hedge-funders bored wife. No? Me either. But, when one person begins to drift from the other, it’s the fight or flight actions that determine whether the relationship can survive it’s drama. Sadly, last night’s episode of Girls may have been the final nail in the coffin for Adam and Hannah’s relationship, which has seen it’s fair share of ups and downs. The episode opened with Hannah getting unnecessarily wasted with her coworkers, thus setting the self-destructive tone for the rest of the episode. Hannah herself says that she’s never gotten drunk like that, like, ever. So why did she feel the need to do so? Probably because she’s begun to feel distant from Adam since he has been so focused on his new role in Major Barbara. Adam barely noticed, let alone cared, that Hannah got hammered and needed to crash at her male coworkers place. Instead he asked her how to style his jacket for the play, “collar up or down?”

Throughout Girls, we’ve seen Adam evolve as a character, from an emotionally disturbed recovering alcoholic to a budding new Broadway actor— so, it comes as no surprise that his transformation would be hard for Hannah to cope with, especially after Patti LuPone planted the seed that his new-found stardom would turn him into an asshole. But was Adam turning into an asshole or was Hannah just fixated on that concept? Hannah’s attempt at role-play wasn’t as disturbing as some of the series’ early Adam/Hannah sex scenes but it nonetheless highlighted the emotional disconnect that’s formed in their relationship. Hannah only threw on a wig and acted like a desperate housewife because she thought it was something that Adam would be into and Adam was genuinely perturbed that she would think such a thing. He explains to her that, “You have an old idea of who I am.” Maybe he’s right. Although he had been into demeaning sex in the past, he explains that he was just a messed up guy coping with his alcoholism. He’s different and happy now and tells her that “It feels amazing to finally care about something.” Essentially admitting that his job matters more to him than she does, he explains that he will be staying with Ray during rehearsals so that he can focus instead of dealing with the drama. “What drama?” Hannah asks, adding, “This is just me.” To which Adam replies, “Exactly.” If Adam can’t handle Hannah now, it’s pretty obvious that he won’t be able to deal with her once he establishes himself as a Broadway actor. Sometimes, people change…they get new jobs, they meet new friends and they grow out of old habits and sometimes, these changes can be the kiss of death for a relationship. Although they didn’t exactly breakup, I don’t see Adam and Hannah recovering from their new dynamic.

OP: Relationships require time, energy and patience to hold onto, no matter how solid the footing they launch from. Now consider the fact that Adam and Hannah’s relationship is built upon Adam running shirtless through Brooklyn to save Hannah from an OCD down-spiral, and they then proceeded to move in with each other soon thereafter. Once we put these facts in a row, the results of last night’s episode should not be incredibly surprising— Adam and Hannah have always relied on a level of insanity and instability that drives their relationships, and for better or for worse kept the relationship interesting for them. Though the writers of the episode definitely left it ambiguous as to whether or not they were truly breaking up, or if Adam was just going to live at his old apartment with Ray for a bit, the one thing we know for sure is that Adam and Hannah are on rocky terms right now. I mean, they were always rocky, but now they’re rocky because they weren’t rocky. They’ve become like every other couple that has to balance their love-life with their work-life, whose sex life is waning and common points of interest are harder to come by. In their quest for a more stable life with one another, Hannah and Adam have somehow lost sight of each other, which sadly, is all too common in relationships. 

Hannah’s blonde wig was very much the center of a lot of the conversation that stemmed from this episode, though I found myself wondering if it really was just a game to her, or if this wig represented a deeply rooted insecurity of who she has become in this relationship. Hannah developing this new persona was a drastic attempt to insert herself into the world of theater that Adam is so clearly engrossed in. Because she was turned away from trying to see the rehearsal for the play, Hannah seeks out other ways to remain relevant to Adam, as if she could transfer some of his love and passion for the play onto her. I wavered in and out of thinking that Hannah’s role-play was an act of desperation, or at the very least an attempt to remain relevant. What Hannah may not have realized is that Adam has done a lot of growing over the course of the 30 episodes we’ve gotten to see him in, and what used to excite him about Hannah is not what excites him about her now. As she seeks out clarification on why Adam wants time apart, she asks, “What drama? This is just me.” Adam’s declaration of “Exactly!” does more to show us that though he might have evolved over time, Hannah might not have been growing in the same direction or at the same rate. Part of drifting apart in a relationship is about an inability to accept others for who they are, and more importantly, who they might never become. For these two, we have just two episodes left to see if they resolve some of these lulls in the relationship before the season finale.  

// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

passthesnacks“Role-Play” - GIRLS Season 3 Episode 10 Recap

THREE QUOTES:

Adam noting the wedges coming between him and Hannah:

"I’m not here to fill up your life with f*ckin’ stories for your f*ckin Twitter." - Adam

After Soojin asks Marnie if she’d like to be her assistant, since her best homo-friend is already the Director of the Gallery:

Marnie: “How old are you?”

Soojin: “Two-four GURL. But for the cred and intrigue of the gallery, I’m going to tell people I’m 22.”  

Shoshana attempting to reconcile Jasper and Dottie’s relationship:

“She’s dating an Egyptian, so she’s, like, super knowledgeable about what’s going on there.”

TWO IMAGES:

What’s more tragic? How hard Marnie just got friend-zoned or the fact that she wore that beanie in multiple scenes during this episode?

Despite Hannah’s attempt to get “so clean” for Adam, she still battles a paperback for his attention

ONE TOPIC TO EXPLORE FURTHER— DRIFTING APART

JP: We’ve all been there. You know, in that relationship where one person is obviously over it and the other person, well, isn’t. The beginning of the end, if you will. We’ve all said and done silly things in our attempts to keep the romance alive. We’ve all thrown on a blonde wig and told our lover to meet us at a bar while we role play as a hedge-funders bored wife. No? Me either. But, when one person begins to drift from the other, it’s the fight or flight actions that determine whether the relationship can survive it’s drama. Sadly, last night’s episode of Girls may have been the final nail in the coffin for Adam and Hannah’s relationship, which has seen it’s fair share of ups and downs. The episode opened with Hannah getting unnecessarily wasted with her coworkers, thus setting the self-destructive tone for the rest of the episode. Hannah herself says that she’s never gotten drunk like that, like, ever. So why did she feel the need to do so? Probably because she’s begun to feel distant from Adam since he has been so focused on his new role in Major Barbara. Adam barely noticed, let alone cared, that Hannah got hammered and needed to crash at her male coworkers place. Instead he asked her how to style his jacket for the play, “collar up or down?”

Throughout Girls, we’ve seen Adam evolve as a character, from an emotionally disturbed recovering alcoholic to a budding new Broadway actor— so, it comes as no surprise that his transformation would be hard for Hannah to cope with, especially after Patti LuPone planted the seed that his new-found stardom would turn him into an asshole. But was Adam turning into an asshole or was Hannah just fixated on that concept? Hannah’s attempt at role-play wasn’t as disturbing as some of the series’ early Adam/Hannah sex scenes but it nonetheless highlighted the emotional disconnect that’s formed in their relationship. Hannah only threw on a wig and acted like a desperate housewife because she thought it was something that Adam would be into and Adam was genuinely perturbed that she would think such a thing. He explains to her that, “You have an old idea of who I am.” Maybe he’s right. Although he had been into demeaning sex in the past, he explains that he was just a messed up guy coping with his alcoholism. He’s different and happy now and tells her that “It feels amazing to finally care about something.” Essentially admitting that his job matters more to him than she does, he explains that he will be staying with Ray during rehearsals so that he can focus instead of dealing with the drama. “What drama?” Hannah asks, adding, “This is just me.” To which Adam replies, “Exactly.” If Adam can’t handle Hannah now, it’s pretty obvious that he won’t be able to deal with her once he establishes himself as a Broadway actor. Sometimes, people change…they get new jobs, they meet new friends and they grow out of old habits and sometimes, these changes can be the kiss of death for a relationship. Although they didn’t exactly breakup, I don’t see Adam and Hannah recovering from their new dynamic.

OP: Relationships require time, energy and patience to hold onto, no matter how solid the footing they launch from. Now consider the fact that Adam and Hannah’s relationship is built upon Adam running shirtless through Brooklyn to save Hannah from an OCD down-spiral, and they then proceeded to move in with each other soon thereafter. Once we put these facts in a row, the results of last night’s episode should not be incredibly surprising— Adam and Hannah have always relied on a level of insanity and instability that drives their relationships, and for better or for worse kept the relationship interesting for them. Though the writers of the episode definitely left it ambiguous as to whether or not they were truly breaking up, or if Adam was just going to live at his old apartment with Ray for a bit, the one thing we know for sure is that Adam and Hannah are on rocky terms right now. I mean, they were always rocky, but now they’re rocky because they weren’t rocky. They’ve become like every other couple that has to balance their love-life with their work-life, whose sex life is waning and common points of interest are harder to come by. In their quest for a more stable life with one another, Hannah and Adam have somehow lost sight of each other, which sadly, is all too common in relationships.

Hannah’s blonde wig was very much the center of a lot of the conversation that stemmed from this episode, though I found myself wondering if it really was just a game to her, or if this wig represented a deeply rooted insecurity of who she has become in this relationship. Hannah developing this new persona was a drastic attempt to insert herself into the world of theater that Adam is so clearly engrossed in. Because she was turned away from trying to see the rehearsal for the play, Hannah seeks out other ways to remain relevant to Adam, as if she could transfer some of his love and passion for the play onto her. I wavered in and out of thinking that Hannah’s role-play was an act of desperation, or at the very least an attempt to remain relevant. What Hannah may not have realized is that Adam has done a lot of growing over the course of the 30 episodes we’ve gotten to see him in, and what used to excite him about Hannah is not what excites him about her now. As she seeks out clarification on why Adam wants time apart, she asks, “What drama? This is just me.” Adam’s declaration of “Exactly!” does more to show us that though he might have evolved over time, Hannah might not have been growing in the same direction or at the same rate. Part of drifting apart in a relationship is about an inability to accept others for who they are, and more importantly, who they might never become. For these two, we have just two episodes left to see if they resolve some of these lulls in the relationship before the season finale.

// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

Comments

1:05 pm - Mon, Feb 24, 2014
4 notes
“Incidentals” - GIRLS Season 3 Episode 8 Recap
THREE QUOTES
1. Elijah advising Adam on life in the Broadway scene:

2. Shoshanna on her life as she knows it:
"Literally, I swear to God, sometimes I think that I’m in The Truman Show, but it’s really just like a walking American Apparel ad, and I don’t even know it.”
2. Jessa seeking solace and company in the UPS delivery man:
“Please don’t go, Rocko. I wanna hear about your weekend. What did you have for dinner? Who is your ex-wife? ROCKO, I’M SO BORED! You bastard!”
TWO IMAGES: 

Marnie attempts to show empathy, but Soojin is not here for this. #bye

At the risk of seeming like a crazy-person, Adam muffles his screams with tissue after learning he landed a part in a play. And this is why we love Adam.
ONE TOPIC TO EXPLORE FURTHER: Learning to be happy for the success of others.
JP: This week’s post is written to the tune of Morrissey’s We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful. As we saw in the last episode of GIRLS, Morrissey had it dead on. Envy may be the least attractive emotion but we all feel it. When someone close to you gets something you want, whether that be an amazing new job or relationship, there is a certain amount of jealousy that you probably feel. We can’t help but think “Why not me?” It’s not that we aren’t happy for our friends and loved ones but rather, their accomplishments tend to highlight the shortcomings and insecurities that we feel exist in our own life. Let’s take Shosh as an example. Yes, she initially dumped Ray because he was a homeless dude who didn’t offer much to write home about but, after a normal bout of ex-stalking, she found out that Time Out New York called his coffee shop a “fresh departure from the average coffee house grind.” His new-found success led her to want to unchoose her choice of breaking up with him as she felt that her own life was in shambles. Think about how many of your friends Facebook stalk the freak out of their ex’s. Do they miss their ex when they find out that he/she lost their job or got fat? Probably not. Do they seem to remember all of their ex’s good qualities when said ex is in a new relationship or doing well professionally? Probably so - case & point with Shosh.
In this week’s episode of GIRLS, Adam lands a part in “Major Barbara,” and upon finding out calls Hannah to share the news. Even though she was in the middle of interviewing Patty LuPone, Hannah takes the call and is clearly very happy for him. She tells Patty, who comments that Adam’s new gig will likely turn him into an asshole and lead him to cheat on her. Hannah explains that she isn’t worried because Adam is funny looking, but Patty reminds her that even the elephant man got laid a lot. Despite the fact that in the not so distant past, Adam creepily proclaimed his love for Hannah and stalked her to the point where she feared him, his new gig (and Patty’s comments about it) left Hannah feeling like the self conscious one in their relationship. Nonetheless, she hosts a celebratory small surprise gathering for him. While helping to plan the shindig, Elijah says “I never thought he’d be the first to fulfill his dream.” Elijah may have been a tad bit bitter, but his comment accurately reflects how most of us would feel when those around us are accomplishing their dreams when we are not accomplishing our own. A healthy amount of envy can serve as the motivation needed to start making moves in our own lives. Hannah was wise enough this time around to realize that Patty f**ked with her head and that she should be (and is) happy for Adam. When our friends and lovers are hitting milestones, we can find inspiration in their accolades to accomplish our own goals and aspirations rather than basking in self doubt and insecurity.
OP: At the risk of over-generalizing an entire generation [who cares, it’s my blog, I’ll do whatever I want], I believe millennials are accustomed to comparing their life, their successes and their pitfalls because of the rising prevalence of social media. This, of course, is also taking into account that humans, by nature are comparing creatures and the concept of “keeping up with Joneses” is by no means new, but it’s more so how and how often we receive this information. Rather than having to wait until a dinner party to find out what your friends have been up to lately, we sign up for services that will essentially tells us how awesome the lives of all of our friends are. But with this comes a built-in cynicism of “How is this bitch always going on vacation and I’m just sitting here on Netflix?” and the subsequent pondering of why you’re not doing anything with your life, why the dude who lived in your dorm in college has already started a company and written a book and you’re eeking out the last bits of your soul to write your blog after your 9-5 is all wrapped up. GIRLS is no stranger to exploring this concept, as we once saw Marnie click through a Facebook album of Charlie on a vacation to Italy with his new girlfriend, though last night, we saw Marnie face this harsh comparative reality once again, as she gets tapped on the shoulder in a fro-yo shop, and Soojin poetically re-enters our lives by declaring, “Hey bitch, you’re taking all the mochi.”  Seeing old faces at unexpected times is definitely jarring, but what is more jarring is that I have Soojin moments on a nearly daily basis, where people I barely know have somehow managed to find their way into the daily catalog of my psyche, where a change in job titles on Facebook equally screams out to me, “Hey Bitch!” 
Marnie, having initially perceived Soojin as a ditzy assistant who got fired for taking a scoop of rosewater ice-cream from Booth, suddenly realizes that this girl is living out her dreams by launching her own gallery in NoHo.The scene perfectly captures a sort of envious congratulations that we bestow upon colleagues and friends, with Marnie’s expression wavering between shock and disgust, asking “Are you serious?” with enough up-speak to denote that she cannot actually fathom this as a possibility before poking holes into the optimistic narrative Soojin has created by reminding her how much hard work goes into opening a gallery, and how she always sees galleries opening and closing.THANKS A LOT, MARNIE! These people are not friends, they hardly know each other, so why does Soojin’s success and ability to say “Fuck it, DGAF” jilt her so much? It’s because in Soojin, Marnie sees her failed potential to capitalize on her own dreams, it highlights that while she still serving coffee at Ray’s, other people have managed to make themselves their own boss. The hug at the end of this scene captures the half-congratulatory excitement we give to anyone with major life updates our age. Yes, Marnie is happy for Soojin, but we do have to question the level of authenticity that is coming in that embrace, if she can ever truly be happy for other people’s successes without pointing a microscope on her  own doubts and shortcomings.
// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

“Incidentals” - GIRLS Season 3 Episode 8 Recap

THREE QUOTES

1. Elijah advising Adam on life in the Broadway scene:

2. Shoshanna on her life as she knows it:

"Literally, I swear to God, sometimes I think that I’m in The Truman Show, but it’s really just like a walking American Apparel ad, and I don’t even know it.”

2. Jessa seeking solace and company in the UPS delivery man:

“Please don’t go, Rocko. I wanna hear about your weekend. What did you have for dinner? Who is your ex-wife? ROCKO, I’M SO BORED! You bastard!”

TWO IMAGES:

Marnie attempts to show empathy, but Soojin is not here for this. #bye

At the risk of seeming like a crazy-person, Adam muffles his screams with tissue after learning he landed a part in a play. And this is why we love Adam.

ONE TOPIC TO EXPLORE FURTHER: Learning to be happy for the success of others.

JP: This week’s post is written to the tune of Morrissey’s We Hate It When Our Friends Become Successful. As we saw in the last episode of GIRLS, Morrissey had it dead on. Envy may be the least attractive emotion but we all feel it. When someone close to you gets something you want, whether that be an amazing new job or relationship, there is a certain amount of jealousy that you probably feel. We can’t help but think “Why not me?” It’s not that we aren’t happy for our friends and loved ones but rather, their accomplishments tend to highlight the shortcomings and insecurities that we feel exist in our own life. Let’s take Shosh as an example. Yes, she initially dumped Ray because he was a homeless dude who didn’t offer much to write home about but, after a normal bout of ex-stalking, she found out that Time Out New York called his coffee shop a “fresh departure from the average coffee house grind.” His new-found success led her to want to unchoose her choice of breaking up with him as she felt that her own life was in shambles. Think about how many of your friends Facebook stalk the freak out of their ex’s. Do they miss their ex when they find out that he/she lost their job or got fat? Probably not. Do they seem to remember all of their ex’s good qualities when said ex is in a new relationship or doing well professionally? Probably so - case & point with Shosh.

In this week’s episode of GIRLS, Adam lands a part in “Major Barbara,” and upon finding out calls Hannah to share the news. Even though she was in the middle of interviewing Patty LuPone, Hannah takes the call and is clearly very happy for him. She tells Patty, who comments that Adam’s new gig will likely turn him into an asshole and lead him to cheat on her. Hannah explains that she isn’t worried because Adam is funny looking, but Patty reminds her that even the elephant man got laid a lot. Despite the fact that in the not so distant past, Adam creepily proclaimed his love for Hannah and stalked her to the point where she feared him, his new gig (and Patty’s comments about it) left Hannah feeling like the self conscious one in their relationship. Nonetheless, she hosts a celebratory small surprise gathering for him. While helping to plan the shindig, Elijah says “I never thought he’d be the first to fulfill his dream.” Elijah may have been a tad bit bitter, but his comment accurately reflects how most of us would feel when those around us are accomplishing their dreams when we are not accomplishing our own. A healthy amount of envy can serve as the motivation needed to start making moves in our own lives. Hannah was wise enough this time around to realize that Patty f**ked with her head and that she should be (and is) happy for Adam. When our friends and lovers are hitting milestones, we can find inspiration in their accolades to accomplish our own goals and aspirations rather than basking in self doubt and insecurity.

OP: At the risk of over-generalizing an entire generation [who cares, it’s my blog, I’ll do whatever I want], I believe millennials are accustomed to comparing their life, their successes and their pitfalls because of the rising prevalence of social media. This, of course, is also taking into account that humans, by nature are comparing creatures and the concept of “keeping up with Joneses” is by no means new, but it’s more so how and how often we receive this information. Rather than having to wait until a dinner party to find out what your friends have been up to lately, we sign up for services that will essentially tells us how awesome the lives of all of our friends are. But with this comes a built-in cynicism of “How is this bitch always going on vacation and I’m just sitting here on Netflix?” and the subsequent pondering of why you’re not doing anything with your life, why the dude who lived in your dorm in college has already started a company and written a book and you’re eeking out the last bits of your soul to write your blog after your 9-5 is all wrapped up. GIRLS is no stranger to exploring this concept, as we once saw Marnie click through a Facebook album of Charlie on a vacation to Italy with his new girlfriend, though last night, we saw Marnie face this harsh comparative reality once again, as she gets tapped on the shoulder in a fro-yo shop, and Soojin poetically re-enters our lives by declaring, “Hey bitch, you’re taking all the mochi.”  Seeing old faces at unexpected times is definitely jarring, but what is more jarring is that I have Soojin moments on a nearly daily basis, where people I barely know have somehow managed to find their way into the daily catalog of my psyche, where a change in job titles on Facebook equally screams out to me, “Hey Bitch!”

Marnie, having initially perceived Soojin as a ditzy assistant who got fired for taking a scoop of rosewater ice-cream from Booth, suddenly realizes that this girl is living out her dreams by launching her own gallery in NoHo.The scene perfectly captures a sort of envious congratulations that we bestow upon colleagues and friends, with Marnie’s expression wavering between shock and disgust, asking “Are you serious?” with enough up-speak to denote that she cannot actually fathom this as a possibility before poking holes into the optimistic narrative Soojin has created by reminding her how much hard work goes into opening a gallery, and how she always sees galleries opening and closing.THANKS A LOT, MARNIE! These people are not friends, they hardly know each other, so why does Soojin’s success and ability to say “Fuck it, DGAF” jilt her so much? It’s because in Soojin, Marnie sees her failed potential to capitalize on her own dreams, it highlights that while she still serving coffee at Ray’s, other people have managed to make themselves their own boss. The hug at the end of this scene captures the half-congratulatory excitement we give to anyone with major life updates our age. Yes, Marnie is happy for Soojin, but we do have to question the level of authenticity that is coming in that embrace, if she can ever truly be happy for other people’s successes without pointing a microscope on her  own doubts and shortcomings.

// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

Comments

5:59 pm - Mon, Feb 17, 2014
19 notes
“Beach House” - GIRLS Season 3 Episode 7 Recap
THREE QUOTES
1. Shosh calling out Hannah’s narcissism, bordering on DGAF territory:
"Seriously, I have never met anyone who thinks their life is so f**king fascinating. I wanted to fall asleep in my own vomit all day listening to you talk about how you bruise more easily than other people."
2. Elijah and Hannah attempting to catch up and share notes on current pop culture: 
E: “Hannah, I’m sorry.”
H: “About the Spring Breakers comment? That didn’t offend me, I thought that movie was a beautiful blend of art and commerce.” 
3. Jessa sticking up for Shosh’s intellectualism: 
“Actually, she is. I’m going to stick up for Shosh on this one and say that I once saw her read the newspaper on her phone.” 
TWO IMAGES

“Beach House” : Queen Marnie overlooks her Hamptons-adjacent kingdom in preparation for a big weekend. Unfortunately, her friends were ready for more of a Spring Break weekend romp.

“The Morning After”: Marnie walks into the kitchen to discover that Hannah, Shoshana and Jessa were grateful for the effort she put into the weekend, even if they did not always express it.
ONE TOPIC TO EXPLORE FURTHER: What are friends for?
JP: When someone asks me which character of GIRLS that I relate the most to, I hesitate to answer because they are all annoying in their own way. Hannah is a self-proclaimed narcissist and borderline sociopath, Marnie is a judgemental self-serving ice queen, Shoshana is a vapid squirrel of a person and Jessa is so damaged and non-committal that she is unable to take the time to work through her own bullshit. Nonetheless, we can all relate to some aspects of these girls whether or not we want to acknowledge it. Marnie is obnoxious, yes, but she accurately captures the priorities of her generation — no one wants to admit that they think or do the same things that she says and does, but we do. We Instagram the hikes we go on and the lattes we drink; she just acknowledges her intentions out loud. If a tree falls in the forest and no one instagrammed it, did it even happen? We all calculate our online presence, to the point where it detracts from our presence IRL. Marnie, aside from the vanity, makes legitimate efforts in her friendships - whether that be planning a birthday party for Hannah (even if only for the Gram proof), or hosting a girls weekend to heal her friendships - she’s trying. I felt bad for Marnie when her perfect weekender blew up in flames - she put a lot of attention and detail into planning it and her friends just shat all over it. Maybe it wasn’t their cup of tea, maybe they didn’t want to do face masks and have a healing session but they could have shown some gratitude or appreciation. Hannah, while maybe not as concerned with her social media presence or hosting perfectly planned evenings, is still narcissistic and egotistical. She has the uncanny ability to make any and every situation about herself. Her ego is what led to one of my favorite scenes on GIRLS thus far, the Shoshana fueled explosion of calling it like you see it TRUTH. She may have been a cruel drunk but she finally unshelved all of her thoughts and feelings about her friends and may have opened up the opportunity for the friends to actually heal, in the way that Marnie originally intended. She said “you guys never listen to me. You treat me like I’m a f**king cab driver. Seriously, you have entire conversations in front of me, like I’m invisible. And sometimes I wonder if my social anxiety is holding me back from meeting the people who are right for me, instead of a bunch of whiny nothings for friends.” What is the point of their friendship?. Maybe they are growing apart, maybe they are staying in each others lives because they have too much social anxiety to branch out or maybe they just really needed to say what has been on their minds all along. 
Friendship requires effort. It requires saying things that you know may hurt your friends feelings but is in their best interest to hear. Friends are the people you share your innermost secrets with knowing that they won’t judge you, they are the people who you go to for support and advice. The girls of GIRLS are exaggerated examples of the stereotypes that exist within most groups of friends but their experiences aren’t as extreme as most make them out to be. We all have that friend who only plans fun events to have cute pictures to post, the friend who makes every situation about themselves and won’t shut up about their own life, the friend who somehow manages to never take accountability for their actions and the friend who lives in their own bubble of naïveté. In the end, friendship means accepting one another despite the differences that exist amongst the group.
—————————————————————————
OP: What are friends for? Friends are the ones you share your greatest triumphs with, who will give you a fist-bump when you get into grad school, who will ask you how your date went, who will unconditionally like all of your instagram posts, even when they’re not interesting. But friends are also the ones we turn to in times of need, when you’re feeling dejected, worthless, stressed about navigating a job-market in a recession that shows you no mercy. Friends are for honesty, for clarity, for keeping it real even when you can’t keep it real with yourself. “Beach House” allowed us to really see beyond each girl, and see them as we haven’t had much opportunity to this season, as collective Girls, as a forest rather than trees. Hannah, Marnie, Shoshana and Jessa have all grown up since we met them in Season One, and part of that has meant that they have grown apart, changed, and as an audience, this is the first time where we are forced to assess if these friendships are still worth hanging onto anymore, if our concept of us, as friends in college, can last us through our mid-twenties. Seeing the opening sequence of Marnie cutting flowers, assigning bedrooms and preparing the beach house is a glimpse into this character completely in her element— setting the stage for what she feels will be a strong refresh for their friendship; but as much as she creates a sense of order in the house, she maybe does not consider that these finer details will be lost on people who won’t sweat the small stuff or might be conceptualizing this weekend in a fundamentally different way [we all saw how structure and order worked out for Jessa during her time at rehab]. While Marnie believes she has set up a castle of healing for these friends, the other three feel like they are in a prison of her controlling tendencies and desire to have life play out like a Crate and Barrel Catalog. 
For as much as this show is set up with a premise of these women being friends, the episode was filled with passive-aggressive jabs and shit-talking that you can’t help but wonder if that’s still how Lena Dunham, Judd Apatow and Jesse Peretz are approaching the direction of these characters. The parallel of the four gay men in the episode, however, showed that Elijah and Co are just as judgmental, narcissistic, unkind, and insecure as any of our four central characters, so that perhaps this is not a condition of our Girls specifically, but of any group of people who have known each other long enough. Plus, the gays are a riot, so please let us have more of them. The culmination of the episode was a perfect unloading of what these characters have been thinking about each other for so long [as well as what we’ve been saying about them on reddit and the blog-o-sphere, lets be real], and putting every single issue out there in a psychologically violent and wounding way and nothing like Marnie had in mind for how the “healing over dinner” would go. I asked myself if this was the ultimate riff for our beloved characters, if they would finally realize that their friendship was taking more energy to maintain than it was worth anymore. But the morning-after scene was brilliant— each of the characters emerges from their bed, slightly hungover, slowly discovering the aftermath of last night, and absorbing the mess that the house was in, and more importantly, the mess that their relationship was in. As they reconvened in the kitchen the next morning, there was a quiet acknowledgement that despite the hurt they may have caused one another the night before, they were willing to work together to heal, to clean up the mess that they’ve allowed their friendship to get to. And as they waited for the bus at the end of the episode, re-enacting the choreography they just learned, there is hope for the Girls, as a unit, to learn to not only accept each other for what they used to be, but to allow their friendship to grow as much as they have grown. When it comes down to it, they prove that they could still have fun as a group even if they’re hungover, resentfully quiet, slumping and no one is stopping to take an Instagram.

“Beach House” - GIRLS Season 3 Episode 7 Recap

THREE QUOTES

1. Shosh calling out Hannah’s narcissism, bordering on DGAF territory:

"Seriously, I have never met anyone who thinks their life is so f**king fascinating. I wanted to fall asleep in my own vomit all day listening to you talk about how you bruise more easily than other people."

2. Elijah and Hannah attempting to catch up and share notes on current pop culture:

E: “Hannah, I’m sorry.”

H: “About the Spring Breakers comment? That didn’t offend me, I thought that movie was a beautiful blend of art and commerce.”

3. Jessa sticking up for Shosh’s intellectualism:

“Actually, she is. I’m going to stick up for Shosh on this one and say that I once saw her read the newspaper on her phone.”

TWO IMAGES

“Beach House” : Queen Marnie overlooks her Hamptons-adjacent kingdom in preparation for a big weekend. Unfortunately, her friends were ready for more of a Spring Break weekend romp.

“The Morning After”: Marnie walks into the kitchen to discover that Hannah, Shoshana and Jessa were grateful for the effort she put into the weekend, even if they did not always express it.

ONE TOPIC TO EXPLORE FURTHER: What are friends for?

JP: When someone asks me which character of GIRLS that I relate the most to, I hesitate to answer because they are all annoying in their own way. Hannah is a self-proclaimed narcissist and borderline sociopath, Marnie is a judgemental self-serving ice queen, Shoshana is a vapid squirrel of a person and Jessa is so damaged and non-committal that she is unable to take the time to work through her own bullshit. Nonetheless, we can all relate to some aspects of these girls whether or not we want to acknowledge it. Marnie is obnoxious, yes, but she accurately captures the priorities of her generation — no one wants to admit that they think or do the same things that she says and does, but we do. We Instagram the hikes we go on and the lattes we drink; she just acknowledges her intentions out loud. If a tree falls in the forest and no one instagrammed it, did it even happen? We all calculate our online presence, to the point where it detracts from our presence IRL. Marnie, aside from the vanity, makes legitimate efforts in her friendships - whether that be planning a birthday party for Hannah (even if only for the Gram proof), or hosting a girls weekend to heal her friendships - she’s trying. I felt bad for Marnie when her perfect weekender blew up in flames - she put a lot of attention and detail into planning it and her friends just shat all over it. Maybe it wasn’t their cup of tea, maybe they didn’t want to do face masks and have a healing session but they could have shown some gratitude or appreciation. Hannah, while maybe not as concerned with her social media presence or hosting perfectly planned evenings, is still narcissistic and egotistical. She has the uncanny ability to make any and every situation about herself. Her ego is what led to one of my favorite scenes on GIRLS thus far, the Shoshana fueled explosion of calling it like you see it TRUTH. She may have been a cruel drunk but she finally unshelved all of her thoughts and feelings about her friends and may have opened up the opportunity for the friends to actually heal, in the way that Marnie originally intended. She said “you guys never listen to me. You treat me like I’m a f**king cab driver. Seriously, you have entire conversations in front of me, like I’m invisible. And sometimes I wonder if my social anxiety is holding me back from meeting the people who are right for me, instead of a bunch of whiny nothings for friends.” What is the point of their friendship?. Maybe they are growing apart, maybe they are staying in each others lives because they have too much social anxiety to branch out or maybe they just really needed to say what has been on their minds all along.

Friendship requires effort. It requires saying things that you know may hurt your friends feelings but is in their best interest to hear. Friends are the people you share your innermost secrets with knowing that they won’t judge you, they are the people who you go to for support and advice. The girls of GIRLS are exaggerated examples of the stereotypes that exist within most groups of friends but their experiences aren’t as extreme as most make them out to be. We all have that friend who only plans fun events to have cute pictures to post, the friend who makes every situation about themselves and won’t shut up about their own life, the friend who somehow manages to never take accountability for their actions and the friend who lives in their own bubble of naïveté. In the end, friendship means accepting one another despite the differences that exist amongst the group.

—————————————————————————

OP: What are friends for? Friends are the ones you share your greatest triumphs with, who will give you a fist-bump when you get into grad school, who will ask you how your date went, who will unconditionally like all of your instagram posts, even when they’re not interesting. But friends are also the ones we turn to in times of need, when you’re feeling dejected, worthless, stressed about navigating a job-market in a recession that shows you no mercy. Friends are for honesty, for clarity, for keeping it real even when you can’t keep it real with yourself. “Beach House” allowed us to really see beyond each girl, and see them as we haven’t had much opportunity to this season, as collective Girls, as a forest rather than trees. Hannah, Marnie, Shoshana and Jessa have all grown up since we met them in Season One, and part of that has meant that they have grown apart, changed, and as an audience, this is the first time where we are forced to assess if these friendships are still worth hanging onto anymore, if our concept of us, as friends in college, can last us through our mid-twenties. Seeing the opening sequence of Marnie cutting flowers, assigning bedrooms and preparing the beach house is a glimpse into this character completely in her element— setting the stage for what she feels will be a strong refresh for their friendship; but as much as she creates a sense of order in the house, she maybe does not consider that these finer details will be lost on people who won’t sweat the small stuff or might be conceptualizing this weekend in a fundamentally different way [we all saw how structure and order worked out for Jessa during her time at rehab]. While Marnie believes she has set up a castle of healing for these friends, the other three feel like they are in a prison of her controlling tendencies and desire to have life play out like a Crate and Barrel Catalog.

For as much as this show is set up with a premise of these women being friends, the episode was filled with passive-aggressive jabs and shit-talking that you can’t help but wonder if that’s still how Lena Dunham, Judd Apatow and Jesse Peretz are approaching the direction of these characters. The parallel of the four gay men in the episode, however, showed that Elijah and Co are just as judgmental, narcissistic, unkind, and insecure as any of our four central characters, so that perhaps this is not a condition of our Girls specifically, but of any group of people who have known each other long enough. Plus, the gays are a riot, so please let us have more of them. The culmination of the episode was a perfect unloading of what these characters have been thinking about each other for so long [as well as what we’ve been saying about them on reddit and the blog-o-sphere, lets be real], and putting every single issue out there in a psychologically violent and wounding way and nothing like Marnie had in mind for how the “healing over dinner” would go. I asked myself if this was the ultimate riff for our beloved characters, if they would finally realize that their friendship was taking more energy to maintain than it was worth anymore. But the morning-after scene was brilliant— each of the characters emerges from their bed, slightly hungover, slowly discovering the aftermath of last night, and absorbing the mess that the house was in, and more importantly, the mess that their relationship was in. As they reconvened in the kitchen the next morning, there was a quiet acknowledgement that despite the hurt they may have caused one another the night before, they were willing to work together to heal, to clean up the mess that they’ve allowed their friendship to get to. And as they waited for the bus at the end of the episode, re-enacting the choreography they just learned, there is hope for the Girls, as a unit, to learn to not only accept each other for what they used to be, but to allow their friendship to grow as much as they have grown. When it comes down to it, they prove that they could still have fun as a group even if they’re hungover, resentfully quiet, slumping and no one is stopping to take an Instagram.

Comments

10:53 am - Mon, Feb 10, 2014
6 notes
passthesnacks:“Free Snacks” - GIRLS Season 3 Episode 6 Recap
Three Quotes
1. After Jessa hands a woman a tiny black dress:
Bougie-Children-Clothing-Store Patron: “Christening dresses are usually white, aren’t they?”  
Jessa: “Not the chic ones.” 
2. After Joe compliments Hannah on her cocaine piece from JazzHate:
Hannah: “Yeah, I feel like that wasn’t as re-tweeted as it should have been, so I appreciate the support.” 
3. After re-hashing literary accomplishments with co-workers:
Karen, GQ Writer: “Yeah, it was a while ago, but it was an unpacking of Jersey Shore from an imperialist lens.” 
[We love Jessica Williams and hope to see her more on the show! Twitter: @msjwilly]
Two Images

Though Marnie definitely broke girl code by dating Shosh’s ex, Ray and Marnie are oddly perfect for each other. 
Can you imagine two people responding to a casting call for Adam and Hannah’s Doppelgangers?
One Topic to Explore Further
JP: This episode of GIRLS focused on the least sexy aspect of being a twenty something – settling or selling out. With Hannah’s book in limbo, she accepts a job writing Neiman-Marcus advertorials for GQ. In spite of the fact that taking on this gig makes her sort of a sellout, she’s enthusiastic about her new job, the perks and benefits are great and they even have a killer, free snack room. She even has a knack for it. Her colleague Karen compliments her for the work she’s done and tells her that she could even have Janice’s job in 10 years. Hannah, in Hannah fashion, retorts that she has no intention of being there in 10 years because she is a real writer. There are few people I know who wouldn’t kill for the opportunity to be in Hannah’s shoes. But Hannah is Hannah, so she heads straight for her bosses office to declare that she has bigger and better plans for her life than her advertorial position. When Hannah realized how unfazed Janice was by her departure, the reality hit her that she has rent to make and a boyfriend at home who isn’t destined for a real job in the traditional sense (aka broke) so she somehow manages to un-quit her cushy job. I can’t say that I blame Hannah for her disdain in selling out; staying with GQ symbolizes Hannah pumping the brakes on actively pursuing her real dreams. Although some look at her decision to stay as a professional setback, I think it shows that she is starting to grow up and make mature decisions. Compromise and balance are two concepts that most twenty somethings are well versed in and Hannah is finally starting to understand the two. She realizes that she has to stay self-motivated and write in the evenings and promises herself that she is going to do so (despite immediately falling asleep the first night she planned to start). I am curious to see if Hannah is ready to manage a steady 9 to 5 and still maintain the balance of pursuing her true dreams on the side. 
OP: Hannah Horvath reaffirmed her status of being “millenial as fuck” in Episode 6, though I found myself incredibly drawn to her internal struggle in this episode. Part of me wanted to shake her and yell at her for taking all of these amazing employment opportunities for granted in an ever-so-murky job market, though I was proud of her for vocalizing an intent to stay true to her vision as a writer. This is what we never got to see in “Sex in the City,” there was no scenes of Carrie Bradshaw questioning her voice as a writer and if writing a monthly column about sex in a magazine was all she really imagined for her writing career. But Hannah is not Carrie— Hannah was raised in a world that told her that she could be whatever she wanted when she grew up and to follow her passions, and the rest would fall in place. She grew up believing that she didn’t have to work for the man in order to eat and pay rent, which is why we sense her hesitance when her new co-worker, Joe,  enlightens her about office hierarchies and says, “We’re all here, selling our souls.” But what scares Hannah more is how comfortable the life at GQ was, with the benefits, snack rooms, corporate gym membership, and hell, even constant positive affirmation from her peers and superiors. But it doesn’t sit well with Hannah, so she quits and un-quits,and if that was not embarrassing enough, her boss deflates any semblance of confidence Hannah has when she says, “I don’t have time for this, can you email me and let me know if you still work here?” Hannah not only realizes that she is absolutely replaceable, but the emotional distance her boss creates between them takes that beacon of millennial hope Hannah has and sets it on fire before burying it in the ground. Luckily, Hannah’s brand new work-BFF Joe affirms her that she can still be a writer and do this job, validating Hannah’s belief that this is not a real writing job while simultaneously assuaging her fears that she has finally hit a brick wall and sold out. While I’m the first to admit that Hannah is suffering from some major first-world problems and dripping in privilege in this episode, the basic idea of wanting to find fulfillment from your work is something I hear from people my age all of the time, from all class and educational backgrounds. We’ve seen how jobs have sucked the joy out of the lives of our parents, and its not ludicrous to want to struggle in that way, to want to find purpose and meaning in what we do. Whether we’re analyzing hashtags for a PR Agency, negotiating terms for a labor union, or teaching a high-school English lesson on “Lord of the Flies,” we all essentially want the same thing— to feel happy, affirmed and passionate about the work we do from 9 to 5 and beyond.
// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //
images via

passthesnacks:“Free Snacks” - GIRLS Season 3 Episode 6 Recap

Three Quotes

1. After Jessa hands a woman a tiny black dress:

Bougie-Children-Clothing-Store Patron: “Christening dresses are usually white, aren’t they?”  

Jessa: “Not the chic ones.”

2. After Joe compliments Hannah on her cocaine piece from JazzHate:

Hannah: “Yeah, I feel like that wasn’t as re-tweeted as it should have been, so I appreciate the support.”

3. After re-hashing literary accomplishments with co-workers:

Karen, GQ Writer: “Yeah, it was a while ago, but it was an unpacking of Jersey Shore from an imperialist lens.”

[We love Jessica Williams and hope to see her more on the show! Twitter: @msjwilly]

Two Images

Though Marnie definitely broke girl code by dating Shosh’s ex, Ray and Marnie are oddly perfect for each other.

Can you imagine two people responding to a casting call for Adam and Hannah’s Doppelgangers?

One Topic to Explore Further

JP: This episode of GIRLS focused on the least sexy aspect of being a twenty something – settling or selling out. With Hannah’s book in limbo, she accepts a job writing Neiman-Marcus advertorials for GQ. In spite of the fact that taking on this gig makes her sort of a sellout, she’s enthusiastic about her new job, the perks and benefits are great and they even have a killer, free snack room. She even has a knack for it. Her colleague Karen compliments her for the work she’s done and tells her that she could even have Janice’s job in 10 years. Hannah, in Hannah fashion, retorts that she has no intention of being there in 10 years because she is a real writer. There are few people I know who wouldn’t kill for the opportunity to be in Hannah’s shoes. But Hannah is Hannah, so she heads straight for her bosses office to declare that she has bigger and better plans for her life than her advertorial position. When Hannah realized how unfazed Janice was by her departure, the reality hit her that she has rent to make and a boyfriend at home who isn’t destined for a real job in the traditional sense (aka broke) so she somehow manages to un-quit her cushy job. I can’t say that I blame Hannah for her disdain in selling out; staying with GQ symbolizes Hannah pumping the brakes on actively pursuing her real dreams. Although some look at her decision to stay as a professional setback, I think it shows that she is starting to grow up and make mature decisions. Compromise and balance are two concepts that most twenty somethings are well versed in and Hannah is finally starting to understand the two. She realizes that she has to stay self-motivated and write in the evenings and promises herself that she is going to do so (despite immediately falling asleep the first night she planned to start). I am curious to see if Hannah is ready to manage a steady 9 to 5 and still maintain the balance of pursuing her true dreams on the side. 

OP: Hannah Horvath reaffirmed her status of being “millenial as fuck” in Episode 6, though I found myself incredibly drawn to her internal struggle in this episode. Part of me wanted to shake her and yell at her for taking all of these amazing employment opportunities for granted in an ever-so-murky job market, though I was proud of her for vocalizing an intent to stay true to her vision as a writer. This is what we never got to see in “Sex in the City,” there was no scenes of Carrie Bradshaw questioning her voice as a writer and if writing a monthly column about sex in a magazine was all she really imagined for her writing career. But Hannah is not Carrie— Hannah was raised in a world that told her that she could be whatever she wanted when she grew up and to follow her passions, and the rest would fall in place. She grew up believing that she didn’t have to work for the man in order to eat and pay rent, which is why we sense her hesitance when her new co-worker, Joe,  enlightens her about office hierarchies and says, “We’re all here, selling our souls.” But what scares Hannah more is how comfortable the life at GQ was, with the benefits, snack rooms, corporate gym membership, and hell, even constant positive affirmation from her peers and superiors. But it doesn’t sit well with Hannah, so she quits and un-quits,and if that was not embarrassing enough, her boss deflates any semblance of confidence Hannah has when she says, “I don’t have time for this, can you email me and let me know if you still work here?” Hannah not only realizes that she is absolutely replaceable, but the emotional distance her boss creates between them takes that beacon of millennial hope Hannah has and sets it on fire before burying it in the ground. Luckily, Hannah’s brand new work-BFF Joe affirms her that she can still be a writer and do this job, validating Hannah’s belief that this is not a real writing job while simultaneously assuaging her fears that she has finally hit a brick wall and sold out. While I’m the first to admit that Hannah is suffering from some major first-world problems and dripping in privilege in this episode, the basic idea of wanting to find fulfillment from your work is something I hear from people my age all of the time, from all class and educational backgrounds. We’ve seen how jobs have sucked the joy out of the lives of our parents, and its not ludicrous to want to struggle in that way, to want to find purpose and meaning in what we do. Whether we’re analyzing hashtags for a PR Agency, negotiating terms for a labor union, or teaching a high-school English lesson on “Lord of the Flies,” we all essentially want the same thing— to feel happy, affirmed and passionate about the work we do from 9 to 5 and beyond.

// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

images via

Comments

3:22 pm - Mon, Feb 3, 2014
20 notes
Looking: "Looking At Your Browser History"

Welcome back, everyone to our third blog post dedicated to HBO’s Looking, where we’ll attempt to look back, look closer and look ahead at what’s at stake for the show and its characters.
Looking Back: 
JP:  The boys of Looking have all come to a crossroads in their lives and are each focused on their own professional pursuits, goals and aspirations.While celebrating the completion of their video game on board an aircraft carrier, Patrick and Owen meet Kevin, a charming Brit who Patrick can tell is homosexual by his “very gay laugh.” After unsuccessfully suggesting that they hook up, Patrick finds out that Kevin is actually his new boss and has already taken it upon himself to skim through his browsing history. Meanwhile, Agustín is fired from his job as an art assistant after he criticizes his boss’s latest piece and Dom begins to plan his new venture, a piri-piri chicken restaurant.
OP: Looking is now at the end of its third episode, and I’m particularly excited to see some of the conflict in the show become more concrete, or rather for the characters to actually have something tougher to grapple with than, say,  just a string of bad okCupid dates. While we have seen all of these characters in work settings before, this episode put a particular focus on Dom, Patrick, and Agustin’s career, and the title, “Looking At Your Browser History,” reflects the blurred lines between the personal and professional, and how each character grapples with the labels and professions they are comfortable associating themselves with. We are also introduced to three new characters- Kevin, Lin and CJ— who represent three parallels to our central characters, and are set up to act as spirit-guides or mentors to Pat, Dom and Agustin. If nothing else, the final scene in this past episode shows that there is potential for bigger and better things for all three central characters, and hopefully, for the show itself as it begins to unfold.

Looking Closer: Though the episode jumped around a lot from scene to scene with characters putting plans into action, we were most drawn to one of this episodes quiet moments of introspection. As Patrick and Agustin talk through their job troubles on the couch of the apartment they used to share, Patrick shares this nugget of wisdom as conversation veers into labeling and how this connects to who we really are: 
“You know what? I don’t know if either of us are very good at being who we think we are.”
OP: While I’m personally not the biggest fan of Patrick as a character, I do appreciate this level of self-reflection from a character that is very much still trying to figure it out, and I actually see him making strides in improving. I’m very drawn to the concept of self-actualization in “Looking,” because in many ways, I think the show will gain enough cultural capital to one day serve as an example for young gay men about what life could be like when we have been lacking these sort of role models in mainstream media. I’ll be honest in noting that queer characters in Will and Grace, Queer As Folk, and even the Real World helped me formulate a concept of myself in the future, as if providing a roadmap for what I could anticipate in my adulthood. 
First, I wonder, how is it that we define who we are in 2014? The characters in this episode have turned to developing professional and artistic identities as a means of securing a sense of self that they seemed to lack in the first two episodes; this shouldn’t be surprising, since many people use their professions to drive their decisions and as the fundamental building block of their identity. But at the end of it all, I also question if gay people are ever really presented with a chronological timeline of how your life should look like. For straight people, at least, you have a general outline of school, career, marriage, kids, building a home, etc, though we know that this is rarely a straight-and-narrow, easy to follow pathway. Since gay men have historically been denied the ability to get married and  have kids, I don’t see it as shocking that these characters actually use their jobs as a barometer of success that is societally acceptable. I’ve mentioned the “Best Little Boy in The World”  theory in the past, and I could not help of think of this again as Patrick went out of his way to re-design Naval Destroyer with a female protagonist to prove a point, and his worth to Kevin. Patrick is grappling with expectations from his boss, his mom, and our society at large on things he can’t seem to control, and his immediate response is to focus his energies on projects that he CAN control—staying up to re-design the game is, in essence, Patrick’s reaction to the stress.  In sum, I’m completely on-board for Looking’s deconstruction of what it means to “be yourself” while still pushing us to see the nuance and beauty in each of these characters’ struggle. 
JP: This episode allowed for each character to take an introspective look at their lives and what they hope to achieve, with some interpersonal breakthroughs and other hiccups along the way. Patrick is prone to bad decisions but his relatable faults are part of his charm. One thing that I can’t help but notice is that Patrick is a little late to the game in achieving a strong sense of identity; he is a 29 year-old who can’t manage to go on a decent date, is drunk more often than not and has inescapable word vomit. Sure, Patrick means well but he has to get a better grasp on how he carries himself both personally and professionally; as sometimes, the two worlds collide (à la Patrick accidentally flirting with his new boss at an industry party). Later, in an attempt to demonstrate his professional  competence, Patrick presents to Kevin a new build for one of the company’s games that he had spent the entire night prior working on. Kevin let’s Patrick know that he was always going to be on his team and tells him that “commitment looks good on you.” (& I agree with him).
Meanwhile, Agustín lost his job after he carelessly insulted his boss’s latest piece. Instead of talking to his boyfriend, Frank, he goes to a coffee shop where he meets CJ, an overly charming sex worker that has such a strong sense of self, it leaves Agustín impressed with his ability to “just put it out there.”
In seeing the characters take strides in achieving personal growth, we are left hopeful. Agustín seems to be optimistic, Patrick is happy to be on Kevin’s team and Dom is enthusiastic about his future endeavor. They seem to evolving into more vibrant characters and I’m excited to see what next week has in store.
Looking Ahead-Things We’d Like To See More Of
1. Dom in Zumba Classes: We’re also cool with Dom in Yoga, Spin, Pilates. Just more Dom. Preferably sweaty.
2. Richie’s Return: We really hope that Patrick will reconcile this relationship and say sorry— Richie was too good to let go so soon in the series.
3. Re-Awakening For Agustín: We’ve sait it before, but Agustín’s character seems to be least in tune with who he is anymore, and we hope that losing his job creates a more dynamic story-arc for him.
// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

Looking: "Looking At Your Browser History"

Welcome back, everyone to our third blog post dedicated to HBO’s Looking, where we’ll attempt to look back, look closer and look ahead at what’s at stake for the show and its characters.

Looking Back:

JP:  The boys of Looking have all come to a crossroads in their lives and are each focused on their own professional pursuits, goals and aspirations.While celebrating the completion of their video game on board an aircraft carrier, Patrick and Owen meet Kevin, a charming Brit who Patrick can tell is homosexual by his “very gay laugh.” After unsuccessfully suggesting that they hook up, Patrick finds out that Kevin is actually his new boss and has already taken it upon himself to skim through his browsing history. Meanwhile, Agustín is fired from his job as an art assistant after he criticizes his boss’s latest piece and Dom begins to plan his new venture, a piri-piri chicken restaurant.

OP: Looking is now at the end of its third episode, and I’m particularly excited to see some of the conflict in the show become more concrete, or rather for the characters to actually have something tougher to grapple with than, say,  just a string of bad okCupid dates. While we have seen all of these characters in work settings before, this episode put a particular focus on Dom, Patrick, and Agustin’s career, and the title, “Looking At Your Browser History,” reflects the blurred lines between the personal and professional, and how each character grapples with the labels and professions they are comfortable associating themselves with. We are also introduced to three new characters- Kevin, Lin and CJ— who represent three parallels to our central characters, and are set up to act as spirit-guides or mentors to Pat, Dom and Agustin. If nothing else, the final scene in this past episode shows that there is potential for bigger and better things for all three central characters, and hopefully, for the show itself as it begins to unfold.

Looking Closer: Though the episode jumped around a lot from scene to scene with characters putting plans into action, we were most drawn to one of this episodes quiet moments of introspection. As Patrick and Agustin talk through their job troubles on the couch of the apartment they used to share, Patrick shares this nugget of wisdom as conversation veers into labeling and how this connects to who we really are:

You know what? I don’t know if either of us are very good at being who we think we are.”

OP: While I’m personally not the biggest fan of Patrick as a character, I do appreciate this level of self-reflection from a character that is very much still trying to figure it out, and I actually see him making strides in improving. I’m very drawn to the concept of self-actualization in “Looking,” because in many ways, I think the show will gain enough cultural capital to one day serve as an example for young gay men about what life could be like when we have been lacking these sort of role models in mainstream media. I’ll be honest in noting that queer characters in Will and Grace, Queer As Folk, and even the Real World helped me formulate a concept of myself in the future, as if providing a roadmap for what I could anticipate in my adulthood.

First, I wonder, how is it that we define who we are in 2014? The characters in this episode have turned to developing professional and artistic identities as a means of securing a sense of self that they seemed to lack in the first two episodes; this shouldn’t be surprising, since many people use their professions to drive their decisions and as the fundamental building block of their identity. But at the end of it all, I also question if gay people are ever really presented with a chronological timeline of how your life should look like. For straight people, at least, you have a general outline of school, career, marriage, kids, building a home, etc, though we know that this is rarely a straight-and-narrow, easy to follow pathway. Since gay men have historically been denied the ability to get married and  have kids, I don’t see it as shocking that these characters actually use their jobs as a barometer of success that is societally acceptable. I’ve mentioned the “Best Little Boy in The World”  theory in the past, and I could not help of think of this again as Patrick went out of his way to re-design Naval Destroyer with a female protagonist to prove a point, and his worth to Kevin. Patrick is grappling with expectations from his boss, his mom, and our society at large on things he can’t seem to control, and his immediate response is to focus his energies on projects that he CAN control—staying up to re-design the game is, in essence, Patrick’s reaction to the stress.  In sum, I’m completely on-board for Looking’s deconstruction of what it means to “be yourself” while still pushing us to see the nuance and beauty in each of these characters’ struggle.

JP: This episode allowed for each character to take an introspective look at their lives and what they hope to achieve, with some interpersonal breakthroughs and other hiccups along the way. Patrick is prone to bad decisions but his relatable faults are part of his charm. One thing that I can’t help but notice is that Patrick is a little late to the game in achieving a strong sense of identity; he is a 29 year-old who can’t manage to go on a decent date, is drunk more often than not and has inescapable word vomit. Sure, Patrick means well but he has to get a better grasp on how he carries himself both personally and professionally; as sometimes, the two worlds collide (à la Patrick accidentally flirting with his new boss at an industry party). Later, in an attempt to demonstrate his professional  competence, Patrick presents to Kevin a new build for one of the company’s games that he had spent the entire night prior working on. Kevin let’s Patrick know that he was always going to be on his team and tells him that “commitment looks good on you.” (& I agree with him).

Meanwhile, Agustín lost his job after he carelessly insulted his boss’s latest piece. Instead of talking to his boyfriend, Frank, he goes to a coffee shop where he meets CJ, an overly charming sex worker that has such a strong sense of self, it leaves Agustín impressed with his ability to “just put it out there.”

In seeing the characters take strides in achieving personal growth, we are left hopeful. Agustín seems to be optimistic, Patrick is happy to be on Kevin’s team and Dom is enthusiastic about his future endeavor. They seem to evolving into more vibrant characters and I’m excited to see what next week has in store.

Looking Ahead-Things We’d Like To See More Of

1. Dom in Zumba Classes: We’re also cool with Dom in Yoga, Spin, Pilates. Just more Dom. Preferably sweaty.

2. Richie’s Return: We really hope that Patrick will reconcile this relationship and say sorry— Richie was too good to let go so soon in the series.

3. Re-Awakening For Agustín: We’ve sait it before, but Agustín’s character seems to be least in tune with who he is anymore, and we hope that losing his job creates a more dynamic story-arc for him.

// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

Comments

10:22 am
7 notes
passthesnacks:
“Only Child” — GIRLS Season 3 Episode 5 Recap
GET IT TOGETHER, GIRLS.
3 Quotes
1. Marnie’s reaction to Ray asking her to keep their sex on the DL, Down Low: "Fuck you. Like I’d advertise this."
2. New publishers on Hannah’s personality: 
"Like Kathy Griffin on truth serum." 
"What the fuck is a truth serum, Bob?
3. Shoshana on her 15 year plan: "It’s really important to my 15-year plan that I get into a good business school because I don’t want to become like my friends and family, you included, no offense."
2 Photos

Black on Black on Black
"You’re my best friend," Marnie whispers to her little ball of fluff after hanging up the phone.
1 Topic to Explore Further
OP: At various points in the episode, we see each of the four central characters making earnest attempts to better their lives with varying levels of success— Hannah finds a new publisher [who will publish an ACTUAL book], Shoshana starts cracking down on her studies, Marnie uses Ray to confront her biggest personality flaws, and Jessa could actually be on the path to getting a stable 9-5 job [who saw that coming?]. One of my biggest concerns about this season was that the characters were starting to seem too self-involved, too scattered for any of them to be making real progress. When I used to teach, I would tell my students that the biggest indicator of someone becoming a bonafide adult is when they can begin to take responsibility not only for their intentions, but for the consequences of their actions, as well. Part of that, in essence, is bologna, because there is no such thing as a manual for how to be a proper adult, and if that statement was a true barometer for adulthood, then we would all be in murky territory, would we not? Regardless, I empathize with this internal battle to get it together while living in a world that doesn’t seem to cut you any slack— it comes at you randomly when you get an email from your bank about an overdraft notice, or a friend calls you out for flaking on brunch and you have no real answer for them. There are times while watching “GIRLS” that the characters seem cartoonishly childish, but if we hold the same mirror up to our lives, I think we’d find that we struggle with the exact same things— finding balance with work, love, friendships. We’re all in the middle of our own stories, and while we may not be on HBO, we could all serve to get our shit together a bit more, so lets not rush to attack these characters for it.
JP: Life is full of highs and lows and the cast of GIRLS seem to be having more of the latter than the former. Their reactions are (per usual) cringe-worthy as they are on a path to self-fulfillment. Marnie realizes that something is wrong with her; she’s lonely and en route to becoming a cat lady. As soon as we think she is making a solid decision to get some advice and continue on the up and up, she sleeps with Ray and leaves his place in her usual holier-than-though fashion. Jessa has been soul-searching and taking to Shoshana for advice and empathy. “Can you believe that my friend told me she died so she didn’t have to hang out with me?” she asks Shoshanna, who tells her cousin that, yeah, she totally gets that. Hannah, worried about the status of her eBook, shows up at David’s funeral and not surprisingly is more interested in schmoozing than mourning his death. Later, she is ecstatic to find out that a new publisher wants to turn her stories into an actual book, not just an eBook. That joy is short lived when Hannah’s dad reveals that Millstreet owns the rights to her stories for three years leaving her in a state of limbo. Overall, each character is on their own narcissistic path to self-fulfillment, as most twenty-somethings are. Here’s to hoping that they continue to get their acts together.
// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //
images via

passthesnacks:

“Only Child” — GIRLS Season 3 Episode 5 Recap

GET IT TOGETHER, GIRLS.

3 Quotes

1. Marnie’s reaction to Ray asking her to keep their sex on the DL, Down Low: "Fuck you. Like I’d advertise this."

2. New publishers on Hannah’s personality: 

"Like Kathy Griffin on truth serum." 

"What the fuck is a truth serum, Bob?

3. Shoshana on her 15 year plan: "It’s really important to my 15-year plan that I get into a good business school because I don’t want to become like my friends and family, you included, no offense."

2 Photos

Black on Black on Black

"You’re my best friend," Marnie whispers to her little ball of fluff after hanging up the phone.

1 Topic to Explore Further

OP: At various points in the episode, we see each of the four central characters making earnest attempts to better their lives with varying levels of success— Hannah finds a new publisher [who will publish an ACTUAL book], Shoshana starts cracking down on her studies, Marnie uses Ray to confront her biggest personality flaws, and Jessa could actually be on the path to getting a stable 9-5 job [who saw that coming?]. One of my biggest concerns about this season was that the characters were starting to seem too self-involved, too scattered for any of them to be making real progress. When I used to teach, I would tell my students that the biggest indicator of someone becoming a bonafide adult is when they can begin to take responsibility not only for their intentions, but for the consequences of their actions, as well. Part of that, in essence, is bologna, because there is no such thing as a manual for how to be a proper adult, and if that statement was a true barometer for adulthood, then we would all be in murky territory, would we not? Regardless, I empathize with this internal battle to get it together while living in a world that doesn’t seem to cut you any slack— it comes at you randomly when you get an email from your bank about an overdraft notice, or a friend calls you out for flaking on brunch and you have no real answer for them. There are times while watching “GIRLS” that the characters seem cartoonishly childish, but if we hold the same mirror up to our lives, I think we’d find that we struggle with the exact same things— finding balance with work, love, friendships. We’re all in the middle of our own stories, and while we may not be on HBO, we could all serve to get our shit together a bit more, so lets not rush to attack these characters for it.

JP: Life is full of highs and lows and the cast of GIRLS seem to be having more of the latter than the former. Their reactions are (per usual) cringe-worthy as they are on a path to self-fulfillment. Marnie realizes that something is wrong with her; she’s lonely and en route to becoming a cat lady. As soon as we think she is making a solid decision to get some advice and continue on the up and up, she sleeps with Ray and leaves his place in her usual holier-than-though fashion. Jessa has been soul-searching and taking to Shoshana for advice and empathy. “Can you believe that my friend told me she died so she didn’t have to hang out with me?” she asks Shoshanna, who tells her cousin that, yeah, she totally gets that. Hannah, worried about the status of her eBook, shows up at David’s funeral and not surprisingly is more interested in schmoozing than mourning his death. Later, she is ecstatic to find out that a new publisher wants to turn her stories into an actual book, not just an eBook. That joy is short lived when Hannah’s dad reveals that Millstreet owns the rights to her stories for three years leaving her in a state of limbo. Overall, each character is on their own narcissistic path to self-fulfillment, as most twenty-somethings are. Here’s to hoping that they continue to get their acts together.

// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

images via

Comments

2:29 pm - Mon, Jan 27, 2014
265 notes

passthesnacks:

girlshbo #GIF of the Day

(Source: takeustoglory)

Comments

2:29 pm
7 notes
passthesnacks:


“Dead Inside” — GIRLS Season 3 Episode 4 Recap
Ah, yes. Behold the glory of Laird coming back into our lives to console Hannah on issues of Life and Death. After all, Laird is “basically [Hannah’s] guardian angel.” [Thanks to U/rombouts for making the above image for us on reddit.com/r/picrequests]
For our GIRLS recaps, we wanted to stick to a 3-2-1 format to keep it simple and consistent.
3 Quotes
1. Shoshana on Bandanas: “I feel like my bandana collection is, like, my most developed collection. My array of bandanas is INSANE.”
2. Jessa on death: "It’s something that happens. It’s like jury duty or, you know, floods. They happen.”
3. Marnie to Ray and Hermie, on quitting her job: ”Fancy people want to work with me. So I’m gonna give them that pleasure and I’m gonna go work with them! So f**k you both, have a nice day, enjoy the rest of the video.”
2 Photos

1. Hannah’s Retelling of Caroline’s Story

2. A screen grab of Marnie’s Youtube Video— oh hey, “FORBIDCharlie1986”!
1 Topic to Explore Further
JP: I can’t say we were surprised to see how Hannah reacted to the death of her editor, David Pressler-Goings. Rather than mourn the death or even shed a tear, Hannah thinks about how his passing will affect her ebook. The Internet reacted by calling her a sociopath. We always knew that Hannah was self-centered but this episode took that concept to a whole other level especially when she resorted to feigning compassion on the stoop at the end of the episode with Adam. Her complete lack of empathy left Adam, Ray and even Caroline shocked. David’s passing allowed for us to see how the entire cast deals with the issue of death. The girls failed to show any indication that they were in the slightest bit emotionally aware, leaving the boys dumbfounded and disturbed. Overall, the boys of GIRLS are the shows saving grace with Laird a new fan favorite and Adam as one of the most grounded characters.
OP: GIRLS has a way of shedding a light-hearted or comedic lens on heavy topics, ranging from mental illness to now, in last night’s episode— DEATH. It seemed like no character was safe, as not only did we lose David, but Laird’s turtle has also passed. RIP. The beauty of last night’s show was in its ability to try to define an appropriate way to respond to death, and I frankly don’t think there is. Sure, Adam seems more emotionally in-tune with how to deal with death, as he has seen more of it in his lifestyle, but Hannah’s search for truth on Gawker is just as representative of our society’s death culture as anything else, lest we forget media coverage of celebrity deaths, such as Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston. The re-telling of Caroline’s story is a bit odd, but to call Hannah sociopathic is another story altogether; I see her trying to connect with Adam, to seem more emotionally available to talk about death. For Hannah, as with all millenials, I have to ask, though— how have we been raised to think about or respond to loss? 
// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

passthesnacks:

“Dead Inside” — GIRLS Season 3 Episode 4 Recap

Ah, yes. Behold the glory of Laird coming back into our lives to console Hannah on issues of Life and Death. After all, Laird is “basically [Hannah’s] guardian angel.” [Thanks to U/rombouts for making the above image for us on reddit.com/r/picrequests]

For our GIRLS recaps, we wanted to stick to a 3-2-1 format to keep it simple and consistent.

3 Quotes

1. Shoshana on Bandanas: “I feel like my bandana collection is, like, my most developed collection. My array of bandanas is INSANE.”

2. Jessa on death: "It’s something that happens. It’s like jury duty or, you know, floods. They happen.”

3. Marnie to Ray and Hermie, on quitting her job: ”Fancy people want to work with me. So I’m gonna give them that pleasure and I’m gonna go work with them! So f**k you both, have a nice day, enjoy the rest of the video.”

2 Photos

1. Hannah’s Retelling of Caroline’s Story

2. A screen grab of Marnie’s Youtube Video— oh hey, “FORBIDCharlie1986”!

1 Topic to Explore Further

JP: I can’t say we were surprised to see how Hannah reacted to the death of her editor, David Pressler-Goings. Rather than mourn the death or even shed a tear, Hannah thinks about how his passing will affect her ebook. The Internet reacted by calling her a sociopath. We always knew that Hannah was self-centered but this episode took that concept to a whole other level especially when she resorted to feigning compassion on the stoop at the end of the episode with Adam. Her complete lack of empathy left Adam, Ray and even Caroline shocked. David’s passing allowed for us to see how the entire cast deals with the issue of death. The girls failed to show any indication that they were in the slightest bit emotionally aware, leaving the boys dumbfounded and disturbed. Overall, the boys of GIRLS are the shows saving grace with Laird a new fan favorite and Adam as one of the most grounded characters.

OP: GIRLS has a way of shedding a light-hearted or comedic lens on heavy topics, ranging from mental illness to now, in last night’s episode— DEATH. It seemed like no character was safe, as not only did we lose David, but Laird’s turtle has also passed. RIP. The beauty of last night’s show was in its ability to try to define an appropriate way to respond to death, and I frankly don’t think there is. Sure, Adam seems more emotionally in-tune with how to deal with death, as he has seen more of it in his lifestyle, but Hannah’s search for truth on Gawker is just as representative of our society’s death culture as anything else, lest we forget media coverage of celebrity deaths, such as Michael Jackson and Whitney Houston. The re-telling of Caroline’s story is a bit odd, but to call Hannah sociopathic is another story altogether; I see her trying to connect with Adam, to seem more emotionally available to talk about death. For Hannah, as with all millenials, I have to ask, though— how have we been raised to think about or respond to loss? 

// Remember to follow us on Twitter @passthesnacks //

Comments

3:23 pm - Thu, Jan 23, 2014
1 note
A New Blogging Venture: Hey Everyone! My friend Oscar and I are two twenty-somethings who probably watch more tv than we should and are no strangers to some serious snack-attacks during our aforementioned TV binges. We started Pass The Snacks with the intention of bringing the back and forth debates and in-depth dialogue that occur on my couch on Sunday nights to the Internet in the hopes that we’ll spark further dialogue. We wanted to start off by reviewing shows such as GIRLS, Looking, True Detective, Game of Thrones, The Newsroom and Mad Men, but the exact format and schedule are still in the works. If you feel inclined, let us know your thoughts or join the discussion on Twitter by following us [@passthesnacks].
And don’t forget to follow our Tumblr!

A New Blogging Venture: Hey Everyone! My friend Oscar and I are two twenty-somethings who probably watch more tv than we should and are no strangers to some serious snack-attacks during our aforementioned TV binges. We started Pass The Snacks with the intention of bringing the back and forth debates and in-depth dialogue that occur on my couch on Sunday nights to the Internet in the hopes that we’ll spark further dialogue. We wanted to start off by reviewing shows such as GIRLS, Looking, True Detective, Game of Thrones, The Newsroom and Mad Men, but the exact format and schedule are still in the works. If you feel inclined, let us know your thoughts or join the discussion on Twitter by following us [@passthesnacks].

And don’t forget to follow our Tumblr!

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